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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of New Zealand fairy tern (Sterna nereis davisae) recovery plan, 2005-15 found in the catalog.

New Zealand fairy tern (Sterna nereis davisae) recovery plan, 2005-15

Katrina Hansen

New Zealand fairy tern (Sterna nereis davisae) recovery plan, 2005-15

by Katrina Hansen

  • 285 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Science & Technical Publishing, Department of Conservation in Wellington, N.Z .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • New Zealand fairy tern -- Conservation -- New Zealand -- Planning.,
  • Wildlife recovery -- New Zealand -- Planning.,
  • Rare birds -- New Zealand.

  • About the Edition

    The New Zealand fairy tern (Sterna nereis davisae) is New Zealand"s rarest indigenous breeding bird. It is a morphologically distinct, geographically and genetically isolated, endemic subspecies of an Australasian species, which consists of two other recognised subspecies: S. n. nereis in Australia and S. n. exsul in New Caledonia. The population is estimated to number 35 to 40 individuals and now only breeds at four breeding sites in the North Island. It is threatened by introduced mammalian predators, disturbance, and habitat modification. This plan presents a revised goal and the objectives required to continue recovery of the New Zealand fairy tern. Actions in this plan focus on the continued protection of the breeding pairs and their progeny in situ. Research is required on critical population demographics.

    Edition Notes

    Other titlesNZ fairy tern recovery plan, 2005-15, New Zealand fairy tern recovery plan, 2005-15
    StatementKatrina Hansen.
    SeriesThreatened species recovery plan -- 57, Threatened species recovery plan series -- no. 57.
    ContributionsNew Zealand. Dept. of Conservation.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL696.C46 H36 2006
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. ;
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16358648M
    ISBN 100478141300
    ISBN 109780478141306
    LC Control Number2007386980

    There are fewer than 40 New Zealand fairy tern left in the world. Their nests, shallow dents in the sand, are easy picking for predators in the sky and on the ground. Feet, vehicle wheels and dogs. See more of New Zealand Fairy Tern Charitable Trust on Facebook. Log In. Forgot account? or. Create New Account. Not Now. Related Pages. The Waitakere Ranges Protection Society Inc. Cause. Bittern Conservation - New Zealand. Product/Service. New Zealand Bird .

    The New Zealand fairy tern has numerous breeding areas, largely incorporating the upper-north region of the North Island. In , there were only about 42 known individuals. With a breeding program in place by the New Zealand Department of Conservation, the population was estimated in at New research is also underway into the birds’ DNA. University of Canterbury conservation geneticist Tammy Steeves and doctoral student Jana Wold will analyse fairy tern genomes to determine whether New Zealand fairy terns are different enough from their Australian and New Caledonian relatives to be considered a separate species.

    The fairy tern is the smallest tern breeding in New Zealand. Adults are mm in length, weigh approximately 70g, have a bill length of mm (mm) and wings mm long (Hitchcock ; Rogers in Higgins & Davies ). The New Zealand fairy tern differs from the Australian. Behav~ourai ecology of the endangered New Zealand Fairy Tern (Tara-iti) Sterna nereis davisae. implications for management A thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a degree of Masters of Scienc~ in Ecology at M~ssey University, Palmerston North New Zealand .


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New Zealand fairy tern (Sterna nereis davisae) recovery plan, 2005-15 by Katrina Hansen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fairy terns are confined to Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia, with endemic subspecies in each country. Fairy terns breed successfully at four sites only in New Zealand: Waipu sandspit, Mangawhai sandspit, Pakiri River mouth (one pair since ), and Papakanui sandspit on the southern headland of the Kaipara Harbour.

The NZ fairy tern (tara iti) is the country's most at risk breeding bird - with its nesting in shells on tidal beaches along with animal interference among the biggest risk to its continued : Mike Dinsdale. New Zealand fairy tern / Tara Iti is New Zealand’s rarest endemic breeding bird and the world’s most endangered shorebird.

The population consists of only 40 birds with just 9 breeding females. With their habitat under severe threat just three chicks fledged in the breeding season. Forest & Bird is working to create an alternative breeding site for our critically endangered New Zealand Fairy Tern on the Kaipara harbour.

The New Zealand Fairy Tern – which has teetered on the brink of extinction since the s – is struggling to find a home. They once nested right around New Zealand fairy tern book North island, however now it has only four breeding sites in Northland and Auckland – all of. New Zealand fairy tern eggs rescued by DoC from threatened wild nests are incubated at Auckland Zoo until a safe recipient nest on any of the four breeding sites becomes available.

Photo/ John Winters. A 21 day-old chick was stood on and crushed when thoughtless people ignored signs and entered this fenced area. The chick had been colour banded. The New Zealand population of white terns is c pairs, with the global population numbering in the hundreds of thousands.

Threats and conservation Introduced feral cats and rats killed breeding birds and took eggs on Raoul Island up until they were eradicated on the island in   The Department of Conservation and the Defence Force have teamed up to build a nest site for New Zealand's critically endangered fairy tern ahead of breeding season.

Rarest bird in the country gets a helping hand. New Zealand’s rarest bird has just had a boost in numbers, with the Department of Conservation welcoming three new fairy tern/tara iti chicks.

Only around 40 of the native birds are thought to. The New Zealand fairy tern Sterna nereis davisae has only one small population of c individuals and its conservation is a priority. The population was declining prior to the mid s.

Management of the three remaining breeding sites was initiated. One of New Zealand's rarest birds has laid an egg. The tara iti/New Zealand fairy tern is on the brink of extinction with fewer than 40 birds alive. So there was much celebration about the first.

One of New Zealand's rarest birds, the tara-iti or fairy tern, has had a successful summer breeding season, with seven chicks expected to fledge. Among the endangered animals are the Maud Island frog, of which there are only ab left, Maui's dolphins, which number j and the New Zealand fairy tern.

The then New Zealand Wildlife Service leapt into action by fencing off nesting sites and appointing wardens to monitor the delicate situation.

Eight years later – and after a satisfying turnaround in the tern population – the New Zealand Fairy Tern Recovery Programme was established. The NZ Fairy Tern (Tara-Iti in Maori) is NZ’s rarest bird, with a population of around only 40 The NZ Fairy Tern Charitable Trust is committed to growth of this tiny population.

We work directly and in partnership with the Department of Conservation and NZ Forest &. The New Zealand Fairy Tern (Sterna nereis davisae) also known as tara-iti is a small tern which breeds on the lower half of the Northland Peninsula of the North Island of New Zealand, and is the smallest tern breeding in New Zealand.

It is a subspecies of the Fairy Tern. Fairy terns are found on the coast from Dampier Archipelago in Western Australia, south to Tasmania and Victoria, with individuals sometimes found on the east coast. They are most commonly found in Western Australia and are rare in New South Wales, the Northern Territory and Queensland.

Some may be found in New Caledonia and New Zealand. The New Zealand fairy tern, Sternula nereis davisae, or tara iti in te reo Māori, is New Zealand’s rarest indigenous breeding NZFT is on the brink of extinction: it is listed in New Zealand as “Nationally Critical” and the latest estimates place its population at fewer.

New Zealand’s rarest bird, the tara iti/New Zealand fairy tern, has produced the first egg of the breeding season. With fewer than 40 birds, the tara iti/fairy tern is critically endangered and despite intensive management has teetered on the brink of extinction since the s.

Twelve New Zealand fairy tern chicks fledged this season, a record number since the protection programme began in the s. Nine of these hatched were on the Mangawhai Wildlife Refuge where, for the first time for many years, there were six pairs breeding.

The New Zealand fairy tern is a seabird also known as the tara-iti. It is a critically endangered native bird, with the current population of only This also includes a mere ten breeding pairs. In the s there were only four breeding pairs and in the known population was only about 30 birds.

The New Zealand fairy tern Sterna nereis davisae has only one small population of c individuals and its conservation is a pri-ority. The population was declining prior to the mid s. Management of the three remaining breeding sites was initiated during.In there were fewer than 40 adult fairy terns, but seven chicks had hatched in the –20 breeding season, compared to two in – It was still New Zealand’s rarest breeding bird, and its survival remained in doubt.

Cats, rats and weasels eat fairy tern eggs, chicks and adults, and have been responsible for their decline. But scientists who've studied the Mangawhai fairy terns now think the despised mangroves may have been playing an important role in the survival of New Zealand's rarest bird. New Zealand Fairy Tern Trust chair Heather Rogan said as soon as the mangroves were removed, egg production plummeted.